Bondage Positions Explained For Complete Newbies

What Exactly Is BDSM?

An erotic activity or kink that revolves on the power dynamics between consenting sexual partners is known as BDSM. Bondage and discipline (B/D), dominance and submission (D/s), and sadism and masochism all fall under the umbrella term BDSM, which is a mix of acronyms for three separate societies that exploit power imbalance for sexual pleasure.

In BDSM, one partner assumes the role of the “dom,” while the other assumes the role of the “sub,” while they both engage in fantasies that are mutually agreed upon. 

4 Bondage Playing Tips

If you’re just getting started with bondage play, here are some things to keep in mind:

Set rules with your companion. Be sure you and your partner are on the same page about what constitutes healthy bondage play before you begin! 

Choose a safe term to use. Bondage play is built on a foundation of mutual trust and agreement between one or more partners. There are times when it is difficult to tell the difference between lighthearted joking and a genuine desire to slow down or end a session. When a boundary has been violated and a break is required, each bondage practitioner should have at least one safe word that they may speak to their partner. It’s also possible to use two safe words—one to signify a halt and the other to indicate that you’re approaching a boundary and should ease down or change the direction of your session.

Take baby steps. When starting out with bondage, it’s best to start with simple BDSM exercises before investing in a more intricate rope system. Purchases like a blindfold and wrist restraints may be used as you go into more complex bondage play and will not break the bank.

 When it comes to risk management during BDSM sessions, there are two primary models: the “safe, sane, and consensual,” and the “risk-aware consensual kink” (RACK). When it comes to the SSC model, it’s all about staying inside the parameters of what you and your partner have deemed “safe.” In the RACK model, those who feel that the word “safe” is problematic since many BDSM activities are inherently dangerous say that the duty for assessing risk tolerance belongs with each person, making explicit agreement even more vital. 

Beginner’s Bondage Positions: Ten Positions

When it comes to bondage, couples are spoiled for choice when it comes to sex positions.

This posture, known as the rag doll position, is known as spooning bondage since the arms of the small spoon partner are tied in front of them. An additional twist is introduced to the spooned partner by having them blindfolded.

With rope or handcuffs, someone is shackled to a bed (typically the headboard) with this kind of bondage. Foreplay and vibrator stimulation may be accomplished in a variety of postures when in bed bondage.

An example of a hogtie is when both wrists and ankles are tied together at the same time.

The posture in which vulva owners are frogtied makes oral sex with the clitoris a breeze.

Submissive’s body parts are tied to the high back of a chair as part of chair bondage. In most cases, their arms are bound behind the chair’s back while their legs are chained to the legs of the chair. When they are in this position, a dominant may ride or perform oral sex on them.

When the submissive partner is upright, their wrists are tied behind their upper body and their legs are spread by a spreader bar attaching their ankles to shackles. For penetration with a penis or dildo, the dominant might approach them in this posture from the back.

In this position, one partner is bent over with their wrists tied to their ankles, making it easier for the other to get in and out of the position.  The dominant partner may easily spank, penetrate, or conduct oral sex on the subordinate partner from behind using this posture.

Shibari: Rope bondage known as shibari, or “decorative tying,” has its origins in Japan’s Edo era of the 17th century. Jute or hemp rope is used in Shibari, which is regarded an attractive kind of the BDSM technique.

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